In Radiation Therapy a good compromise between tumor control with sufficiently high doses and avoidance of complications by sparing the healthy tissue has to be found. In the planning process, the clinician searches for the compromise that best suits the patient.

Radiation Therapy

When planning a therapy, different competing quality criteria like prospects of treatment success, risk of side effects and costs have to be considered. Thereby, chances and risks must be individually balanced for every patient. Using a real-time decision support tool the most appropriate treatment for a patient can be interactively selected from them.

Radiotherapy and especially intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) is a treatment form customized to the individual patient. Therapy planning aims for a good compromise between tumor control with sufficiently high doses and avoidance of complications by sparing the healthy tissue. In the planning process, the clinician searches for the compromise that best suits the patient.

Screenshot der Software zur medizinischen Strahlentherapieplanung
© Fraunhofer ITWM

Screenshot of the User Interface: all aspects of the therapy plan can be controlled by our methods.

BMBF Project SPARTA

This project focuses on techniques for the adaption of therapy plans based on multimodal data during the radiation treatment; our goal is to invent decision support methods for this plan adaptation.

Video: Tailor-Made Radiation Therapy

Radiation therapy is one of the most essential elements in cancer treatment. But properly planning radiation therapy is a highly complex task. We have joined an alliance with medical physicists and physicians to improve the therapy planning process.

Development of the interactive multi-criterion radiation therapy planning system earned our researchers Karl-Heinz Küfer, Michael Bortz, Alexander Scherrer, Philipp Süss and Katrin Teichert and their research partners Thomas Bortfeld, Jürgen Debus, Wolfgang Schlegel and Christian Thieke the Stifterverband for German Science‘s 2016 award. The jury specifically recognized »the broad viability of the method in treating thewidespread illness of cancer as well as the relevance to international markets.«