Rate-based Models

Reactive absorption is often used to separate sour gases from gas streams. Currently, reactive absorption is investigated for the removal of CO₂ from power plant flue gases in order to reduce CO₂ emissions and thus to mitigate global warming.

Reactive Absorption

Rate-based Modell
© ITWM

Only rate-based models are suited for predictive simulations of reactive absorption.

Reactive absorption is often used to separate sour gases from gas streams, for example in the chemical industry or in natural gas cleaning. Currently, reactive absorption is investigated for the removal of CO₂ from power plant flue gases in order to reduce CO₂ emissions and thus to mitigate global warming.

 

Search for new and efficent solvents and process modifications

In the reactive absorption process, the gas and the solvent flow counter-currently through the absorber column and CO₂ is absorbed and reacts with the solvent. The solvent is then regenerated in the desorber column which requires energy. In power plant applications, steam is extracted from the power plant so that the overall efficiency of the power plant drops significantly. A focus of past and current research is the search for new, more efficient solvents and the investigation of process modifications to increase the energy efficiency. Such process modifications are evaluated beforehand through model-based process simulations.

Highly complex models

Only rate-based models are suited for predictive simulations of reactive absorption. These models are complex and require a large number of input parameters. We have a long-standing track record in developing and validating such models. This includes experimental studies of gas solubilities in the reactive systems and spectroscopic studies of the chemical speciation, namely with NMR spectroscopy. The results form the basis for the model development which is a complex optimization task.

The models are carefully validated against pilot plant data. Once validated, the models are needed for a better understanding of the process in general, for scale-up, studies of stationary and instationary operation, troubleshooting, and training of staff. Our industrial partners in the field are chemical, energy, and engineering companies.

 

Industrial Partners

Our industrial partners are corporations of the chemical industry, energy suppliers and plant manufacturers.